Posts Tagged ‘vermiculture’

Donna’s Garden – Container Update May 24, 2011

A quick look at the container gardenorganic vegetable garden heirloom tomato square foot peppers prepper gmo monsanto asparagus broccoli economy raised bed gardening brocolli shallots onions carrots herbs kitchen seeds fruit citrus cucumbers insects stink bugs thai home rainwater catchment irrigation chickens bees composting worms vermiculture bernanke peter schiff ron paul federal reserve jp morgan Rush Limbaugh tea party Matt Mittan goldman ruth stout food storage dollar Donna’s Square Foot Garden

HARVESTING WORM CASTINGS TO FERTILIZE MY ORGANIC GARDEN MAY 2011

www.goingorganic.weebly.com I wanted to show you a quick video on harvesting worm castings from my worm bin that I buried in the old greenhouse. I put the worms in a long large plastic bin and half buried it in the dirt during the winter time. Most of my worms had already died because of getting too cold. Once I got them into the ground in the old greenhouse, they warmed up and stayed close to the bottom of the bin to stay warm. Now that we have had several months of warm weather, a handful of surviving worms have multiplied many times over. Now that the weather is getting so hot, the worms are staying down close to the bottom again. This time to try to stay cool. By keeping the plastic worm bin in the ground, the temperature averages 58 to 78 degrees year round. To harvest my worm castings (black gold for garden soil), I use a standard metal strainer. The holes are approximately 1/8th inch square. The holes in the strainer are just the size of the granular shape of worm castings. I hang the strainer over a standard Rubbermaid box. I am just taking out a small amount in this demonstration. The rest of the bedding stays in the strainer and gets dumped back into the worm bin. Once I have enough for several of my potted tomatoes plants. I pour the castings into a smaller container and take them to the garden. I sprinkle the castings on the soil around each of the plants. Worm castings have many organic natural benefits for the soil: 1) Improves soil structure; 2) enriches

Companion Planting For Organic Vegetables – How To Make It Work

Visit: www.HomeOrganicGarden.net Organic gardening is much more then just avoiding the use of chemicals on your garden. For many people it is an outlook on living using nature’s laws to grow their fruits, vegetables, and other plants naturally. This is usually a personal choice made in light of much research done into the importance of diet as it relates to our health and longevity. Studies have shown that organically grown foods have higher concentrations of vitamins and minerals then those grown using chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. Organically grown fruits and vegetables are not only better health wise but they also avoid the accidental exposure to those chemical agents that are used in large scale commercial farming that is so common in today’s world. http Here are 10 key components that are a fundamental part of organic gardening. 1. Healthy Soil – This is probably the most fundamental aspect of any organic garden. Healthy soil that is replenished naturally will grow healthy food stuffs year after year. Organic fertilizers such as manure and composted garden, yard, and kitchen waste are easily recycled back into the earth creating nutrient rich soil that will grow all manner of healthy plants. 2. Avoid all chemical or synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. This will not only ensure that your soil stays naturally organic but it also relieves the worry of harm to your family and pets should they come in contact with these dangerous

Companion Planting For Organic Vegetable & Herb Gardens

Visit: www.HomeOrganicGarden.net Organic gardening is much more then just avoiding the use of chemicals on your garden. For many people it is an outlook on living using nature’s laws to grow their fruits, vegetables, and other plants naturally. This is usually a personal choice made in light of much research done into the importance of diet as it relates to our health and longevity. Studies have shown that organically grown foods have higher concentrations of vitamins and minerals then those grown using chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. Organically grown fruits and vegetables are not only better health wise but they also avoid the accidental exposure to those chemical agents that are used in large scale commercial farming that is so common in today’s world. http Here are 10 key components that are a fundamental part of organic gardening. 1. Healthy Soil – This is probably the most fundamental aspect of any organic garden. Healthy soil that is replenished naturally will grow healthy food stuffs year after year. Organic fertilizers such as manure and composted garden, yard, and kitchen waste are easily recycled back into the earth creating nutrient rich soil that will grow all manner of healthy plants. 2. Avoid all chemical or synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. This will not only ensure that your soil stays naturally organic but it also relieves the worry of harm to your family and pets should they come in contact with these dangerous

Aquaponic Update – Growing Mung Beans Lettuce and Collards using Goldfish Coi and t5 & t10s

Aquaponic Update Started growing some mung beans and they are quickly surpassing existing lettuce and collards. Thes things grow like weeds, especially in aquaponics. Also added t5 and t10 lights and some earthworm castings, bone meal and blood meal and it seems to be working well! This is my survival plan to survive coming food shortages due to climate change.

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