Posts Tagged ‘tv’

Alys Fowler: Growing beans and peas on an allotment

Alys Fowler discovers how to make a cage out of willow sticks to help beans and peas flourish in communal gardens

Alys Fowler: Planting seeds and growing vegetables

TV gardener Alys Fowler explains how to grow crops, from planting seeds in trays to transferring seedlings to the ground

Gardening: Vegetables Made in the Shade

This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report from voaspecialenglish.com | http Not all vegetables need lots of sunshine. Mark Hoffman and his wife, Guia, own a bed-and-breakfast guesthouse in rural Kempton, Illinois. The Hoffmans have also been growing food and flowers for twenty-five years. For almost ten of those years, Mr. Hoffman has been working with shade plantings. He says visitors to his website — greenhousebed.com — often ask how to plant in shade spaces. “The bottom line here is that most plants will produce more in full sun. But if you do not have full sun, there are other options.” For example, he grows tomatoes near oak trees. Oak trees can produce a lot of shade. But Mr. Hoffman says his tomato plants grow as long as they get five hours a day of direct sunshine, especially morning sun. Not only does this go against the traditional advice that tomatoes need six, eight, even twelve hours a day of full sun. It also shows how plants and tree roots can share nutrients and water. Mr. Hoffman also planted asparagus around a tree at its drip line, the area below the outer limit of the branches. Rain drips down right on the asparagus. He says the asparagus “has been there for six years now and is doing wonderfully.” The Hoffmans’ website includes a list of vegetables, flowers and herbs that have produced acceptably for them in partial shade. Besides tomatoes and asparagus, these include broccoli, daylilies, horseradish, Irish potatoes, oregano and winter

In the Garden: Growing Your Own Lettuce

This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report from voaspecialenglish.com | http Many people have lettuce in a salad at the beginning of a meal. The ancient Egyptians and Romans had it at the end. Either way, gardening experts say lettuce is one of the easiest vegetables to grow in a garden.There are hundreds of kinds of head and leaf lettuces besides the most popular choices, like iceberg, Boston, bibb and romaine. The best time to plant the seeds is during cool weather. Gardening advisers at the University of Illinois Extension say the best planting temperature is fifteen degrees Celsius. You can use a seed tray to start the seeds indoors. The container should be deep enough to hold at least three centimeters of soil. Leave about one centimeter of space between the soil and the top of the container. The container should have holes in the bottom so extra water can flow out. Cover the seeds lightly with soil. If the soil is not already a little wet, give it some water, but not too much. Too much water could drown the seeds. Next, cover the seed tray with paper. Remove the paper when the seedlings are tall enough to touch it. You can transplant the seedlings into the garden when they are about two to three centimeters tall. Do this when the weather is not too hot and not too cold. Take out as much of the soil as you can with the seedlings. Plant them in the ground in a hole that is bigger than the lettuce roots. Keep the plants watered, but not too heavily. Planting

Garden Girl TV: Vertical Gardening Three

Patti shows you more innovative ways to vertical garden. Check out her website at www.gardengirltv.com

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor