Posts Tagged ‘of’

Gardening: Vegetables Made in the Shade

This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report from voaspecialenglish.com | http Not all vegetables need lots of sunshine. Mark Hoffman and his wife, Guia, own a bed-and-breakfast guesthouse in rural Kempton, Illinois. The Hoffmans have also been growing food and flowers for twenty-five years. For almost ten of those years, Mr. Hoffman has been working with shade plantings. He says visitors to his website — greenhousebed.com — often ask how to plant in shade spaces. “The bottom line here is that most plants will produce more in full sun. But if you do not have full sun, there are other options.” For example, he grows tomatoes near oak trees. Oak trees can produce a lot of shade. But Mr. Hoffman says his tomato plants grow as long as they get five hours a day of direct sunshine, especially morning sun. Not only does this go against the traditional advice that tomatoes need six, eight, even twelve hours a day of full sun. It also shows how plants and tree roots can share nutrients and water. Mr. Hoffman also planted asparagus around a tree at its drip line, the area below the outer limit of the branches. Rain drips down right on the asparagus. He says the asparagus “has been there for six years now and is doing wonderfully.” The Hoffmans’ website includes a list of vegetables, flowers and herbs that have produced acceptably for them in partial shade. Besides tomatoes and asparagus, these include broccoli, daylilies, horseradish, Irish potatoes, oregano and winter

In the Garden: Growing Your Own Lettuce

This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report from voaspecialenglish.com | http Many people have lettuce in a salad at the beginning of a meal. The ancient Egyptians and Romans had it at the end. Either way, gardening experts say lettuce is one of the easiest vegetables to grow in a garden.There are hundreds of kinds of head and leaf lettuces besides the most popular choices, like iceberg, Boston, bibb and romaine. The best time to plant the seeds is during cool weather. Gardening advisers at the University of Illinois Extension say the best planting temperature is fifteen degrees Celsius. You can use a seed tray to start the seeds indoors. The container should be deep enough to hold at least three centimeters of soil. Leave about one centimeter of space between the soil and the top of the container. The container should have holes in the bottom so extra water can flow out. Cover the seeds lightly with soil. If the soil is not already a little wet, give it some water, but not too much. Too much water could drown the seeds. Next, cover the seed tray with paper. Remove the paper when the seedlings are tall enough to touch it. You can transplant the seedlings into the garden when they are about two to three centimeters tall. Do this when the weather is not too hot and not too cold. Take out as much of the soil as you can with the seedlings. Plant them in the ground in a hole that is bigger than the lettuce roots. Keep the plants watered, but not too heavily. Planting

Container Gardening: An Easy Way to Grow Your Own Food

Container gardening is a great way for beginning gardeners to start producing their own food. Jon Traunfeld from the University of Maryland Extension talks about everything you need to know, from potting soil to planting, to grow vegetables in containers. From five-gallon buckets to Earth boxes, container gardening gives you a ton of options for any budget. Read about container gardening here: www.agnr.umd.edu And check out individual vegetable profiles here: growit.umd.edu Thisvideo is brought to you by the Home and Garden Information Center, part of University of Maryland Extension. provides resources and encourages people to start their own food gardens. www.growit.umd.edu Learn about our Grow It Eat It campaign, which Check out our facebook page for more gardening advice: www.facebook.com Animation by Chris Heuer, Freefall FX, LLC Shot and edited by Brett Wooldridge and Emily Heimsoth

How to grow a Pineapple inside!

So simple, yet so fun & they even produce pineapples! Do this with your kids. No knives, mess or skill needed. Great for adults too. And the best part is ……(insert drum roll here)…..you can eat the pineapple after planting the top. NOTHING gets wasted!

Companion Planting For Organic Vegetables – How To Make It Work

Visit: www.HomeOrganicGarden.net Organic gardening is much more then just avoiding the use of chemicals on your garden. For many people it is an outlook on living using nature’s laws to grow their fruits, vegetables, and other plants naturally. This is usually a personal choice made in light of much research done into the importance of diet as it relates to our health and longevity. Studies have shown that organically grown foods have higher concentrations of vitamins and minerals then those grown using chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. Organically grown fruits and vegetables are not only better health wise but they also avoid the accidental exposure to those chemical agents that are used in large scale commercial farming that is so common in today’s world. http Here are 10 key components that are a fundamental part of organic gardening. 1. Healthy Soil – This is probably the most fundamental aspect of any organic garden. Healthy soil that is replenished naturally will grow healthy food stuffs year after year. Organic fertilizers such as manure and composted garden, yard, and kitchen waste are easily recycled back into the earth creating nutrient rich soil that will grow all manner of healthy plants. 2. Avoid all chemical or synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. This will not only ensure that your soil stays naturally organic but it also relieves the worry of harm to your family and pets should they come in contact with these dangerous

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