Posts Tagged ‘culture’

Garden Update: Planting Vegetables

The turning, tilling, weeding, and making of rows is finished. Now it’s time to lant the garden and get the vegetables into the ground. The shade provided from the Tree of Heaven is relieving. I find it hard to get up from my lawn chair at times, so comfortable and enjoyable to watch the balloons flying overhead. I work up quite an appetite though and go through water like a hydroelectric dam. My body craves salt and I drink Gatorade to replenish electrolytes. Nibbling on the wild edibles that grow near the garden’s edge helps keep me going too; mustard, clover, lemon wood sorrel, cleavers and wild violets. Just having some fun and trying to show a different perspective on gardening. Gardening is hard, but rewarding work. I enjoy getting my hands dirty and seeing the fruits of my labor come to form. Just because the work is hard doesn’t mean we can’t have a little fun doing it. Laughing and making fun is what keeps me motivated. Tags: vegetable gardening planting plant sow reap weed cultivate hoe rake shovel agriculture garden horticulture fruit flower science botany botanical nightshade mustard legume grass family “farmers market” “food for the needy” organic off grid be prepared survival self reliance “pepper prepper” “raw food” homegrown down on the farm three sisters squash beans corn maize “teosinte grass” evolution selective harvest breeding monoculture glucosinolate herbicide nematocide fungicide bio diesel biology permaculture wildcrafting

TEDxManhattan – Stephen Ritz – Green Bronx Machine – Growing Our Way Into A New Economy

www.tedxmanhattan.org Stephen Ritz is a South Bronx teacher/administrator. With the help of extended student and community family they have grown over 25000 pounds of vegetables in the Bronx while generating extraordinary academic performance. His Bronx classroom features the first indoor edible wall in NYC DOE which routinely generates enough produce to feed 450 students healthy meals and trains the youngest nationally certified workforce in America. Stephen has consistently moved attendance from 40% to 93% daily, helped fund/create 2200 youth jobs, captured the US EPA Award for transforming mindsets and landscapes in NYC, recently won the ABC Above and Beyond Award, helped earn his school the first ever Citywide Award of Excellence from the NYC Strategic Alliance for Health and attributes these results directly to growing vegetables in school. His speech at Columbia University, “From Crack to Cucumbers,” along with the release of a You-Tube Video (Urban Farming NYC) resulted in a national following including an invite to the White House Garden. Dedicated to harvesting hope and cultivating minds, Stephen dreams of opening a nationally replicable Career Technical Education public school in the poorest Congressional District in America rooted in urban agriculture, green and sustainable initiatives. For more information, visit www.greenbronxmachine.com More information at www.tedxmanhattan.org About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth

Gardening: Vegetables Made in the Shade

This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report from voaspecialenglish.com | http Not all vegetables need lots of sunshine. Mark Hoffman and his wife, Guia, own a bed-and-breakfast guesthouse in rural Kempton, Illinois. The Hoffmans have also been growing food and flowers for twenty-five years. For almost ten of those years, Mr. Hoffman has been working with shade plantings. He says visitors to his website — greenhousebed.com — often ask how to plant in shade spaces. “The bottom line here is that most plants will produce more in full sun. But if you do not have full sun, there are other options.” For example, he grows tomatoes near oak trees. Oak trees can produce a lot of shade. But Mr. Hoffman says his tomato plants grow as long as they get five hours a day of direct sunshine, especially morning sun. Not only does this go against the traditional advice that tomatoes need six, eight, even twelve hours a day of full sun. It also shows how plants and tree roots can share nutrients and water. Mr. Hoffman also planted asparagus around a tree at its drip line, the area below the outer limit of the branches. Rain drips down right on the asparagus. He says the asparagus “has been there for six years now and is doing wonderfully.” The Hoffmans’ website includes a list of vegetables, flowers and herbs that have produced acceptably for them in partial shade. Besides tomatoes and asparagus, these include broccoli, daylilies, horseradish, Irish potatoes, oregano and winter

In the Garden: Growing Your Own Lettuce

This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report from voaspecialenglish.com | http Many people have lettuce in a salad at the beginning of a meal. The ancient Egyptians and Romans had it at the end. Either way, gardening experts say lettuce is one of the easiest vegetables to grow in a garden.There are hundreds of kinds of head and leaf lettuces besides the most popular choices, like iceberg, Boston, bibb and romaine. The best time to plant the seeds is during cool weather. Gardening advisers at the University of Illinois Extension say the best planting temperature is fifteen degrees Celsius. You can use a seed tray to start the seeds indoors. The container should be deep enough to hold at least three centimeters of soil. Leave about one centimeter of space between the soil and the top of the container. The container should have holes in the bottom so extra water can flow out. Cover the seeds lightly with soil. If the soil is not already a little wet, give it some water, but not too much. Too much water could drown the seeds. Next, cover the seed tray with paper. Remove the paper when the seedlings are tall enough to touch it. You can transplant the seedlings into the garden when they are about two to three centimeters tall. Do this when the weather is not too hot and not too cold. Take out as much of the soil as you can with the seedlings. Plant them in the ground in a hole that is bigger than the lettuce roots. Keep the plants watered, but not too heavily. Planting

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