How to Grow a Vegetable Garden if you RENT your Home

John from www.growingyourgreens.com goes on a field trip to a viewers house who is growing a full-on backyard garden in the home he does not own. In this episode you will see what is being grown in this North Las Vegas desert garden and some of the techniques that are being used to grow food today. Why put off until tomorrow what you can start GROWING today? After watching this episode, hopefully you will have some ideas on what you can do to start growing food today even if you do not own your own property.

25 Responses to “How to Grow a Vegetable Garden if you RENT your Home”

  • MyAussieDay says:

    Great video John

  • informationwarfare says:

    i have been inspired

  • sandertel says:

    Hello John, imagine this beautiful garden piece o’ work in a well executed and equally well manicured Aquaponics version… Would be extremely nice… Regards, Sander Tel.

  • burpo17 says:

    I have 20 acres & a large pasture; I’ll be growing a wide variety of organic plants w/organic soil, beneficial organisms, etc. Minimal tillage w/narrow rows leaving strips of native plants preserving wild genetic diversity (wild onion, grass, flowers, etc.) & native soil rich in soil ecology that depend on the native plants. I’ll be getting organic compost (Southern Oregon Compost LLC) & local hydroponic store products (InAndOutGardens) for organic growing; I’ll be making videos, it begins!

  • serenitylady60 says:

    This is gorgeous, he has done an amazing job. Perfect timing as I am starting to plan a square foot/ raised garden and this has given me some great ideas and tips!!

  • TheOrdep1976 says:

    Very inspirational TY

  • PREPPERNW says:

    John’s influence on this garden is everywhere! His influence is all over my garden. Awesome video john!

  • HomelessOnline says:

    Are the raised planter boxes open on the bottom (allowing water to drain straight into the Vegas backyard wasteland), or is there a sheet of wood attached to the bottom? I ask because I rent and most of my backyard is bricks. I’ve considered building some planter boxes, but the one thing I’m not clear on is whether or not I should close the bottom. (If I do close the bottom, should I drill some holes before filling the boxes with dirt?)

  • buddyhump says:

    I too was wondering about closing in the bottom so it could be moved (heavy but moveable?). I figured drilled holes would allow it to drain.

  • RylanTy says:

    All my raised beds containing a fruit bearing tree, shrub and vine (grapes) have bottoms. The ones for herbs, melons, peppers and such do not. The bottoms have planks of wood spaced every 1-8 inches (seams). Some are spaced up to 8 inches because I want ‘for sure’ good drainage. I believe that the soil shouldn’t come off after I give it a few years to develop more roots. The roots will hold in the soil so it doesn’t just fall off upon lifting.

  • OfThings says:

    That would be nice if I knew a gardener around my area. The closest to that is Cowboy Trails Farm, where I wanted to volunteer there and learn a thing or two, but I have problems with transportation. That is a good idea,though.

  • alan30189 says:

    Great job producing something in that climate!

  • alan30189 says:

    He probably used landscape cloth on the bottoms, that would be my guess. That would prevent the dirt from just flowing into the rocks and sand below over time.

  • yankeegal01 says:

    John, could you provide more info on this? Such as what is he using under the beds [ground tarp]? And what kid of wood did he use for these. Would love to do this since as long as it’s not invasive to the stone on the property. Currently I’ve just got all my plants in self watering containers and would love to do away with those.

  • yankeegal01 says:

    I’m wondering too! I hope John can give a few more details on this!

  • RylanTy says:

    All my raised beds containing a fruit bearing tree, shrub and vine (grapes) have bottoms. The ones for herbs, melons, peppers and such do not. The bottoms have planks of wood spaced every 1-8 inches (seams). Some are spaced up to 8 inches because I want ‘for sure’ good drainage. I believe that the soil shouldn’t come off after I give it a few years to develop more roots. The roots will hold in the soil so it doesn’t just fall off upon lifting.

  • RylanTy says:

    All my raised beds containing a fruit bearing tree, shrub and vine (grapes) have bottoms. The ones for herbs, melons, peppers and such do not. The bottoms have planks of wood spaced every 1-8 inches (seams). Some are spaced up to 8 inches because I want ‘for sure’ good drainage. I believe that the soil shouldn’t come off after I give it a few years to develop more roots. The roots will hold in the soil so it doesn’t just fall off upon lifting.

  • Helenelalala says:

    yeah! Many gardeners would absolutely drive helpers for their garden! Maybe there is a website showing who needs help in yr area? I’d check around, make friends at farmers markets, maybe ”help” sell the produce a bit and start meeting ppl, ect. But use your observation before going to somebody house or garden that you don’t know. Not everybody is mentally sane. Take your time when choosing who to trust.

  • kellzdrip says:

    hey I just sent this link to someone. I thought it was great and will be a big help! I posted my first video not long ago and would love any advice you have to give, I bet your busy as all but would love for you to check it out! Thanks!

  • Patricia Brown says:

    Wonderful You did such a fabulous job. Not only with the variety of plants, but the garden is absolutely beautiful. I know it was a lot of work, but the effort is fabulous. pbrownred from southern CA

  • ShaolinCenter says:

    Awesome!

  • ShaolinCenter says:

    I loved this “field trip” John!!! Thanks!

  • martilindsey says:

    Here’s a practically free way to accomplish this! You can make raised beds out of free shipping pallets. See my blog post at martisadventuresinsandiego.blogspot.com

  • MinervasGarden says:

    Such a cool garden–thank you, John!

  • peacedoula says:

    This is the nicest desert home garden I’ve ever seen!!! Great job renter & thank you so much for sharing your back yard garden with us :-) Thank you John for the field trip! I’m working on a raised garden in the high desert area 2hrs south of Vegas & having a tough time finding organic compost & some rock dust too. I’ve made my own compost from
    my organic co-op food scraps, but its not enough to fill my long garden beds with. Would you mind posting where this renter purchased his compost or roc

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