Garden Update: Planting Vegetables

The turning, tilling, weeding, and making of rows is finished. Now it’s time to lant the garden and get the vegetables into the ground. The shade provided from the Tree of Heaven is relieving. I find it hard to get up from my lawn chair at times, so comfortable and enjoyable to watch the balloons flying overhead. I work up quite an appetite though and go through water like a hydroelectric dam. My body craves salt and I drink Gatorade to replenish electrolytes. Nibbling on the wild edibles that grow near the garden’s edge helps keep me going too; mustard, clover, lemon wood sorrel, cleavers and wild violets. Just having some fun and trying to show a different perspective on gardening. Gardening is hard, but rewarding work. I enjoy getting my hands dirty and seeing the fruits of my labor come to form. Just because the work is hard doesn’t mean we can’t have a little fun doing it. Laughing and making fun is what keeps me motivated. Tags: vegetable gardening planting plant sow reap weed cultivate hoe rake shovel agriculture garden horticulture fruit flower science botany botanical nightshade mustard legume grass family “farmers market” “food for the needy” organic off grid be prepared survival self reliance “pepper prepper” “raw food” homegrown down on the farm three sisters squash beans corn maize “teosinte grass” evolution selective harvest breeding monoculture glucosinolate herbicide nematocide fungicide bio diesel biology permaculture wildcrafting

25 Responses to “Garden Update: Planting Vegetables”

  • gwsears says:

    You’re doing a great job with your crops Roosevelt! But if’n you’re gonna be a really productive, successful farmer you’ll need some hickory bib overalls and a straw hat. Makes the plants feel much more confident. They feel like they have a real man of the soil nurturing them along.
    GWS

  • BornRandy62 says:

    when the plants get moisture and then go without they develop a thick skin since they assume that it is end of season and it is time to put on seeds. when they get additional water later on the skins tend to split. grapes, tomatos even certain mellons and squash have done this. steady water supply seems to stop this from happening. either from consistant rain or from watering.

  • neapedoff says:

    That’s a pretty sick garden, Roos! Any thoughts on no till permaculture? I’m a noob who hates hard knocks :)

  • 31u says:

    Great video,nice garden ,need to planet my own garden again “BUT” it was so much work by myself last two years.”May go smaller”to my own needs .

  • MiWilderness says:

    :) Where in the world do you buy overalls these days? I would really like to get a few pair. We had a saddlery shop for horses years ago, but it has long since closed, they sold overalls.

    I’d like a nice straw hat too for taking me some siestas. :) AND, really, for keeping the sun off of me. the boonie hat doesn’t provide quite enough coverage. LOL!

    Thanks GWS,

    Roosevelt

  • MiWilderness says:

    I had to Google no till permaculture to see what it was and still am a bit unclear as I wasn’t able to find a very good explanation.

    I do mulch my plants with grass or straw to keep in moisture and prevent the sun from drying out the soil, did that today.

    Also, I let weeds grow between the rows as they don’t compete and most get trampled anyway. The weeds I do pull go in between the rows and end up as mulch/ compost, or they grow and keep the raised beds from eroding away….

  • MiWilderness says:

    I am not sure if that is what no till permaculture is, but I normally turn my garden over every fall at end of season, and again in spring before planting. Turning it loosens the soil and mixes the old weeds and plants back into the soil so it can break down.

    Big stringy plants, rotten tomatoes and such go into a compost pile which is not really maintained in any way. As that breaks down I add it back in to the soil gradually over time. I occasionally turn the compost pile.

    I don’t know if…

  • MiWilderness says:

    that answers the question or brings up more. I’m curious about no till permaculture gardening myself now. I try to do everything by hand without machines and use all natural fertilizers, bug killers and such if at all possible. I’ve never added chemicals to a garden other than dishsoap mouthwash, epsom salt, cola, etc.We use a lot of Jerry Baker’s Grandma Puck’s gardening remedies and recipes.

    If you know more about the no till gardening please explain, as it’s new to me.

    Thanks, Roosevelt

  • MiWilderness says:

    Thanks,

    Smaller is sometimes better. My last garden was only 12 x 25 feet, I staggered plants to pack em in and the whole thing was covered with weed block. I ran a trickle soaker hose between the rows under the weedblock and all I had to do was crack the water spicket open a 1/4 turn and walk away. That garden was almost work free except for turning it over, planting, and picking the veggies.

    You should give it a go,

    Roosevelt.

  • neapedoff says:

    I only recently came to it myself, my (mis?)conception is it centers around biodiversity instead of monoculture to reduce opportunity for encroachment of unwanted plants by using dense pre-planned arrangements of guild species- those which grow best side by side symbiotically, making them resistant to blight & infestation due to less concentration of any one species in a given spot yet very high density of yummy greens.

  • neapedoff says:

    Properties of mycelium supposedly make various companion plantings very hardy what with mycellial tendencies being to spread the nutrient love when it’s abundant, and advanced permaculture involves all heights of plants preplanned with canopy layers, tall bushes, vines, and tinies. Apple is the only guild I’ve looked too closely at (verrrrry cooperative species!), but there’s a forum at permies.com full of good stuff.

  • neapedoff says:

    There was a Japanese dude named Fukuoka who pioneered the no-till method of seed scattering by hand sealing the seeds in clay balls before tossing (sewing) so as to protect from birds & rodents. This reduced erosion and thickened his topsoil. An Austrian guy name Sepp Holzer farming on a mountainside in the Alps contributed other common sense ideas such as maximizing retention of moisture from precipitation by terracing where possible to maximize land yield and further minimize erosion.

  • neapedoff says:

    The lazy version of this I’ve started doing (perhaps idiotically) is to walk around the slopey woods near me to lay all the dead wood which naturally falls downhill perpendicular to it’s natural angle, which should lessen slope & erosion over time while upping moisture retention in the spots it’s done. All this should up land fertility, in theory. It’s my first year planting and this is all theory to me at present.

  • neapedoff says:

    Fukuoka achieved yields on par with industrial agriculture organically, while thickening topsoil like a pilmp. Other essential reading on this subject is a book you may be familiar with, Mycelium Running.

  • neapedoff says:

    In light of mycelium’s omnipresence in the soil and willingness to work alongside the nudging we give it seedwise, breaking up mycelial networks in the land we’re out to improve seems counter intuitive, thus the no-tillage. Thrilling ideas which I might just have come to in error, having never put them into practice. There ya go, though!

  • neapedoff says:

    Woops! Enjoy reading that in reverse order, guys!

  • neapedoff says:

    Anywhoo I’ll let you know how my new apple guild garden goes if it does. Finding no clay nearby, I lazily pushed the seeds into the ground with my fingers and walked off happily. Lemmuh know your thoughts, you tubers!

  • MiWilderness says:

    I have a couple of Paul Stamet’s books, but that isn’t one.

  • MiWilderness says:

    I’ve looked at Permies a bit, but haven’t been there in a few.

  • MiWilderness says:

    That’s a lot to take in, but it all sounds sensible to me. I do plan on taking some wine cap, Stropharia rugosoannulata, mushroom spores and spraying the garden with them.

    A true permaculture garden at this spot would be impossible as we only get the plot for one season and then it’s up for grabs. Planting trees wouldn’t be allowed, or allowing chickens to graze in the garden free ranging.

  • MiWilderness says:

    I like the idea of avoiding monoculture as that really is what causes these diseases and insect infestations in plants.

    Lots of great information to absorb.

    Thank you!

  • neapedoff says:

    He views Mycelium Running as his magnum opus! The mycorestoration section is very uplifting, as is the news that they have found a species in South America that can break down plastics. None too soon, what with that garbage continent we’ve made in the North Pacific. Goooooo science?

  • LoneWoodpecker says:

    Lovely garden! You did a great job and it was fun watching! Keep up the good work. You don’t use any seeds from Monsanto, do you?

  • 31u says:

    Thanks sounds like a great idea to me.

  • MiWilderness says:

    I hope not! It’s hard to know where the seeds come from. I have a video coming up showing the seed packs, but the plants simply state the name of plant and how to grow.

    thanks,

    Roosevelt

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